Easy Steps On How To Source And Buy Bitcoin

You can buy bitcoin through exchanges and stockbrokers, or from other owners. Regardless of where you get it, consider the risks of investing in digital assets.

Buying  bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies can be a fun way to explore an experimental new investment. But it’s also true that any investment in cryptocurrency should carry a warning label like cigarettes: “This product may be harmful to the health of your finances. Never buy more than you can afford to lose.”

The value of bitcoin — the world’s first and most popular cryptocurrency  — has risen from $3,237 in December 2018 to new record highs above $65,000 in November 2021 (see price below). Like all cryptocurrencies, bitcoin is speculative and subject to much more volatility than many tried-and-true investments, such as stocks, bonds and mutual funds.

One common rule of thumb is to invest no more than 10% of your portfolio in individual stocks or risky assets like bitcoin. 

 

Current Bitcoin Trading Price

Here’s the spot price in U.S. dollars to buy one bitcoin today:

Data is pulled from Google Finance and may be delayed up to 20 minutes. Information is solely for informational purposes and not for trading purposes or advice.

Buying Bitcoin And Other Cryptocurrencies In 4 steps

  1. Decide where to buy bitcoin. Cryptocurrency exchanges like Coinbase and a few traditional brokers like Robinhood can get you started investing in bitcoin.

  2. Think about how to store your cryptocurrency. Are you going to keep your bitcoin in a hot wallet or a cold wallet?

  3. Make your purchase. Figure out how much you want to invest in bitcoin.

  4. Manage your investment. Determine your long-term plan for this asset.

     

1. Decide where to buy bitcoin

There are a few different ways to buy bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, including exchanges and traditional brokers.

Cryptocurrency Exchanges

You can purchase bitcoin from several cryptocurrency exchanges. Many offer dozens of cryptocurrency choices, while others simply have bitcoin and a handful of alternatives. They carry a variety of different fees and consumer protections, so do your diligence before choosing.

Traditional Stockbrokers

The choices among traditional brokers that give customers a way to buy and sell bitcoin are few right now — Robinhood  was the first mainstream investment broker to offer bitcoin (Robinhood Crypto is available in most, but not all, U.S. states). Like its stock-trading platform, Robinhood charges no fees for bitcoin trades.

Of the online brokerages and cryptocurrency exchanges that NerdWallet reviews, the following currently offer bitcoin.

Available for:

Binance.US

Access to buy and sell nearly 60 cryptocurrencies.

Coinbase

Access to buy and sell nearly 100 cryptocurrencies.

eToro

Trading platform with access to 17 cryptocurrencies.

Gemini

Ability to buy and sell more than 50 cryptocurrencies.

Robinhood

Seven cryptocurrencies including bitcoin, bitcoin cash and ethereum.

SoFi Active Investing

Offers more than 20 cryptocurrencies for trading including bitcoin, ethereum and litecoin.

TradeStation

Offers trading for five cryptocurrencies, including bitcoin, bitcoin cash and ethereum.

Webull

Offers 10 cryptocurrencies for trading, including bitcoin, bitcoin cash, ethereum and litecoin.

Kraken

Offers more than 90 cryptocurrencies

 

 

 

Other Ways To Buy Or Invest In Bitcoin

  • Bitcoin ATMs. These work like normal ATMs, only you can use them to buy and sell bitcoin. Coin ATM Radar  shows more than 27,000 bitcoin ATMs around the U.S.

  • Peer-to-peer bitcoin owners. You can buy bitcoin directly from other bitcoin owners, much like you would buy items on Craigslist, through peer-to-peer tools like Bisq, Bitquick and LocalBitcoins.com. Use extreme caution if buying bitcoin directly from individuals.

  • Exchange-traded funds. The financial firm ProShares launched the first bitcoin ETF in October of 2021. The fund (ticker: BITO) doesn’t invest directly in bitcoin, however — instead, it invests in futures contracts for bitcoin.

  • Grayscale funds. Grayscale Investments is a digital currency asset manager. Two of its investment trusts — Grayscale Bitcoin Trust (GBTC) and Grayscale Ethereum Classic Trust (ETCG) — are publicly traded, which means you can buy them through many discount brokers. There are fees, and GBTC often trades at a premium — that means GBTC shares often cost more than bitcoin, even though bitcoin is its only holding. The thinking is that some investors are willing to pay extra to buy bitcoin through a traditional exchange, without needing to worry about wallets and storage.

     

What To Know Before You Buy

Have information you may need handy. Setting up a cryptocurrency account takes minutes, but you’ll need to provide some information, including your Social Security number and the number to your bank account, debit card or credit card to fund your bitcoin account. Some providers also may require you to have a picture ID. Record and safeguard any new passwords for your crypto account or digital wallet (more on those below).

Don’t use a credit card. Although some providers allow you to purchase bitcoin by credit card, making investments by borrowing from a high-interest product like a credit card is never a good idea.

Understand investor protections. Or in this case, the lack thereof: Bitcoin and other cryptocurrency investments are not sure by the securities investors protectiob corporation for exchange failures or theft, a protection that traditional stock brokerage accounts enjoy on up to $500,000. Some exchanges like Coinbase provide private insurance, but that doesn’t protect against individual online breaches like someone stealing your password.

Use a secure, private internet connection. This is important any time you make financial transactions online. Buying bitcoin while at the coffee shop, in your hotel room or using other public internet connections is not advised.

 

2. Decide How To Store Bitcoin

Bitcoin Can Be Stored In Two Kinds Ofdigital wallets: a hot wallet or a cold wallet. With a hot wallet, transactions generally are faster, while a cold wallet often incorporates extra security steps that help to keep your assets safe but also make transactions take longer.

Hot Wallet

With a hot wallet, bitcoin is stored by a trusted exchange or provider in the cloud and accessed through an app or computer browser on the internet. Any trading exchange you join will offer a free bitcoin hot wallet where your purchases will automatically be stored. But many users prefer to transfer and store their bitcoin with a third-party hot wallet provider, also typically free to download and use.

Why choose a wallet from a provider other than an exchange? While advocates say the blockchain technology behind bitcoin is even more secure than traditional electronic money transfers, bitcoin hot wallets are an attractive target for hackers. As Bitcoin.org warns: “Many exchanges and online wallets suffered from security breaches in the past and such services generally still do not provide enough insurance and security to be used to store money like a bank.”

There are many hot wallet providers, offering a range of wallet types. Here are a few:

  • Coinbase: Also a popular bitcoin currency exchange, Coinbase offers free online hot wallets and insures losses due to security breaches or hacks, employee theft, or fraudulent transfers.

  • Electrum: Software that allows your bitcoin to be stored on your laptop or desktop computer.

  • Blockchain: Like Coinbase, Blockchain is an online hot wallet; unlike Coinbase, Blockchain isn’t a currency exchange and is considered a less attractive target for hackers.

  • Mycelium: A mobile-only bitcoin wallet, with versions available for Android or iPhone users.

Although some hot wallet providers offer insurance for large-scale hack attacks, that insurance may not cover one-off cases of unauthorized access to your account.

Cold Wallet

A cold wallet is a small, encrypted portable device that allows you to download and carry your bitcoin. Cold wallets can cost as much as $100 but are considered much more secure than hot wallets.

Cold wallet providers include:

  • Trezor: This company offers small, key-size cold wallets ranging from about $60 to $220.

  • Ledger Nano: Designed like a thumb drive, Ledger Nano has cold wallets ranging from about $60 to $120.

When creating accounts for your digital wallets and currency exchange, use a strong password and two-factor authentication.

 

3. Make Your Purchase

After linking your bitcoin wallet to the bitcoin exchange of your choice, the last step is the easiest — deciding how much bitcoin you want to buy. While a single bitcoin costs tens of thousands of dollars, the cryptocurrency (trading symbol BTC or XBT) can be bought and sold for fractional shares, so your initial investment could be as low as, say, $25.

 

4. Manage Your Investment

If you like the idea of day trading, one option is to buy bitcoin now and then sell it if and when its value moves higher. But if you see a future for bitcoin as a digital currency, perhaps your investment plan is to buy and hold for the long haul. Whatever your plan, know that owning bitcoim creates a complex tax situation.

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